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Plotinus  A. D. 204 - 270

bulletTexts:  Neoplatonism
bulletTexts:  Plotinus
bulletTexts:  The Enneads
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The Cambridge Companion to Plotinus by Lloyd P. Gerson
Plotinus Online Texts
bulletThe Enneads (at vt.edu)
bulletThe Enneads (at Classics Archive)

 

Plotinus Biography
From the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  Examines the life and thought of Plotinus, a Roman philosopher of Egyptian descent. Includes his studies in religion and ethics.  Excerpt:

Plotinus was born at Lycopolis, in Upper Egypt in 204 CE, and died at Campania in 270 CE. In the twenty-eighth year of his life he applied himself to philosophy, and attended the lectures of the most celebrated men of that time in Alexandria. After studying under Ammonius for some ten years, he accompanied the Emperor Gordian in his campaign against the Persians, in order to learn something of their philosophy. In this object he failed, owing to the unsuccessful issue of the undertaking; he was even obliged to flee for his life to Antioch. In 244 he went to Rome and won numerous adherents to his teaching, among them the Emperor Gallienus and his wife Salonina. He conceive the idea of founding an ideal city in Campania, with the approval and support of the emperor: this city was to be called Platonopolis, and its inhabitants were to live according to the laws of Plato. Gallienus was not disinclined to enter into the plan; but it was thwarted by the opposition of the imperial counselors. He taught in Rome until about 268, retiring then to the country estate of a disciple in Campania. Plotinus did not reduce his doctrine to writing until toward the close of his life, and then did not publish it. His pupil Porphyry, arranged the fifty-four treatises of Plotinus in six Enneads, placing them in logical order from the simplest to the most abstruse, as well as chronological sequence. They were first printed in a Latin translation by Marsilio Ficino at Florence in 1492, then in Greek and Latin at Basel, in 1580.

 

On Beauty
Ennead's On Beauty is a copy of Plotinus' critique of beauty translated by Stephen MacKenna.

 

Neoplatonism

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